OnlineUtah.com Banner
History of Black Hawk War, Utah
Taken from the Utah History Encyclopedia. (Links Added)
-2-

The years 1865 to 1867 were by far the most intense of the conflict. Latter-day Saints considered themselves in a state of open warfare. They built scores of forts and deserted dozens of settlements while hundreds of Mormon militiamen chased their illusive adversaries through the wilderness with little success. Requests for federal troops went unheeded for eight years. Unable to distinguish "guilty" from "friendly" tribesmen, frustrated Mormons at times indiscriminately killed Indians, including women and children.

In the fall of 1867 Black Hawk made peace with the Mormons. Without his leadership the Indian forces, which never operated as a combined front, fragmented even further. The war's intensity decreased and a treaty of peace was signed in 1868. Intermittent raiding and killing, however, continued until 1872 when 200 federal troops were finally ordered to step in.

The Black Hawk War erupted as a result of the pressures white expansion brought to Native American populations. White settlement of Utah altered crucial ecosystems and helped destroy Indian subsistence patterns which caused starvation. Those who did not starve often succumbed to European diseases. Contemporary sources indicate that Indian populations in Utah in the 1860s were plummeting at frightening rates. White efforts to establish reservations contributed additional pressures.


Page 2
Google
 
Web onlineutah.com
Comments & Questions to OnlineUtah.com

Home | Area Codes | Cities | Climate | Credits | Counties | Dinosaurs | Disclaimer | Dining |

Education | Entertainment | Government | Health | History | Hot Springs | Industry | Lakes | Lodging |

Maps | Media | Mountains | Museums | Parks | People | Photo Gallery | Quick Facts |

Quizzes | Recreation & Sports | Religion | Rivers | Sites | Travel | Weather |




Mark Robinson Realty Brokers