History of the Frisbee, Utah
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Walter Frederick Morrison, the son of the inventor of the automobile sealed-beam headlight, returned home after World War II, finishing his European campaign as a prisoner in the now famous Stalag 13. He worked for a while as a carpenter, but like his father, he had an inventive mind. The time was 1948; flying saucers from outer space were beginning to capture people's imagination. Why not turn the concern into a craze? As a Utah youth, he scaled pie tins, paint-can lids, and the like. He remembered those pleasurable moments and his mind turned to perfecting the pie tin into a commercial product. First, he welded a steel ring inside the rim to improve the plate's stability, but without success. In a surge of serendipity, he adopted the child of the times--plastic. Plastic was the ideal stuff for Frisbee, It seems impossible to imagine anything better. And, perhaps, Frisbee is plastic's finest form. Initially, Morrison used a butyl stearate blend. He recalls: "It worked fine as long as the sun was up, but then the thing got brittle, and if you didn't catch it, it would break into a million pieces! The original Morrison's Flyin' Saucer was his accurate vane model, named for the six topside curved spoilers (vanes). They were designed to improve lift by facilitating the Bernoulli principle, which they didn't. Curiously, the spoilers were on backwards; that is, they would theoretically work only for a counterclockwise spin.

From: Frisbee, A Practitioner's Manual and Definitive Treatise By: Stancil E.D. Johnson, M.D. Workman Publishing Company 231 East 51 Street New York, New York 10022 July, 1975 ISBN 0-911104-53-4

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